Book review ‘Beastly Thing’: The commissario plumbs corruption

Book review ‘Beastly Thing’: The commissario plumbs corruption
Article from The Seattle Times:

‘Beastly Things: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery’

by Donna Leon

Atlantic Monthly Press, 296 pp., $ 25

“Beastly Things,” Donna Leon’s 21st mystery of her Commissario Guido Brunetti series set in Venice, doesn’t disappoint. All her trademark strengths shine in this swiftly paced, sophisticated tale of greed versus ethics.

Leon is an American who’s made Italy her home for 30 years. So it’s no accident that the changing times, rising prices, tiresome tourists and increasing pollution that trouble her echo and add authority to her characters’ concerns.

This time, the body of a man is found floating in a canal. He has no ID. Because there’s water in his lungs, the medical examiner says the victim was alive when thrown in. But the cause of death is three stab wounds in the back.

Brunetti and his assistant, Inspector Lorenzo Vianello, spend the bulk of the book hunting the corpse’s identity. As in past Leon mysteries, the pair owe a large debt of gratitude to their colleague, Signorina Elettra, a secretary/computer whiz who supplements their leg work with her sometimes less-than-legal electronic forays into the secret lives of the case…………………continues on The Seattle Times
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Book Review | The Beginner’s Goodbye: Imperfect marriage described perfectly
Article from Columbus Dispatch:

By  Margaret Quamme

For The Columbus Dispatch Sunday April 15, 2012 5:38 AM

Few writers could get away with the premise of Anne Tyler’s new novel, The Beginner’s Goodbye: Several months after his wife’s sudden death, a young widower finds her there in the flesh again, examining beets at the farmers market or walking beside him as he strolls around the neighborhood.

It’s a plot that could easily sink into whimsy or sappiness, but Tyler’s light touch avoids both traps.

It helps that her hero is thoroughly ordinary. Aaron Woolcott, 35 when his wife dies, considers himself “unluckier but not unhappier” than other people. A bout with the flu when he was a toddler has left him with a crippled right arm and leg, a speech impediment that’s worse when he’s nervous and a prickly attitude toward anyone who offers him help.

Aaron and his older sister, Nandina, the sole remnants of their family, work at the family publishin…………………continues on Columbus Dispatch
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The Enchanted April (New York Review Books Classics)

The Enchanted April (New York Review Books Classics)

A recipe for happiness: four women, one medieval Italian castle, plenty of wisteria, and solitude as needed.

The women at the center of The Enchanted April are alike only in their dissatisfaction with their everyday lives. They find each other—and the castle of their dreams—through a classified ad in a London newspaper one rainy February afternoon. The ladies expect a pleasant holiday, but they don’t anticipate that the month they spend in Portofino will reintroduce them to their true natures and reacquaint them with joy. Now, if the same transformation can be worked on their husbands and lovers, the enchantment will be complete.

The Enchanted April was a best-seller in both England and the United States, where it was a

List Price: $ 14.95

Price: $ 7.04

New books tell the Titanic story

New books tell the Titanic story
Article from New York Daily News:

The British liner Titanic sails out of Southampton, England, on April 10, 1912, at the start of its doomed maiden voyage.

Hugh Brewster recounts what happened to the rich and famous aboard the ship.

While it seems time will never turn the page on the sinking of the Titanic 100 years ago, publishing is dedicating many a page in books that cover the epic disaster that cost the lives of 1,514 of the 2,224 on board from all aspects.

“Gilded Lives, Fatal Voyage : The Titanic’s First-Class Passengers and Their World” by Hugh Brewster. An intense recounting of life on board the Titanic with…………………continues on New York Daily News

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In new book ‘Funny Food,’ Bill and Claire Wurtzel turn healthy breakfasts into …
Article from New York Daily News:

Broccoli, cucumbers and carrots make up a breakfast table tableau, from ‘Funny Food: 365 Fun, Healthy, Silly, Creative Breakfasts.’

New Yorkers Claire and Bill Wurtzel, authors of ‘Funny Food’

Getting kids to eat their fruits and veggies just got a lot easier, thanks to a pair of New York grandparents.

A whimsical new book, “Funny Food: 365 Fun, Healthy, Silly, Creative Breakfasts,” is turning eggs, waffles, oatmeal and more into edible art.

Though the idea is now used to teach kids to eat healthy, co-authors Bill and Claire Wurtzel thought of it long before they had daughters Lisa and Nina.

Bill, an advertising art d…………………continues on New York Daily News

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Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity
In today’s world, yesterday’s methods just don’t work. In Getting Things Done, veteran coach and management consultant David Allen…
Sex on the Beach – Jack Hammer Sex Series: Book I
Jack Hammer is a successful, self-made man and has all the female attention he wants at work and everywhere else he turns. Despite…

US sues to lower prices of e-book best-sellers

US sues to lower prices of e-book best-sellers
Article from Monroe News Star:

WASHINGTON — The government says avid best-seller readers who use electronic books have been getting ripped off. Tina Fey’s “Bossy Pants,” Tim Tebow’s “Through My Eyes” and Keith Richards’ “Life” — maybe they should have cost less.

The Justice Department and 15 states sued Apple Inc. and major book publishers Wednesday, alleging a conspiracy that raised the price of electronic books. They said the scheme cost consumers more than $ 100 million in the past two years by adding $ 2 or $ 3, sometimes as much as $ 5, to the price of each e-book.

If there was price fixing, even the e-book version of the hot-selling Walter Isaacson biography of Steve Jobs, the late genius behind Apple computers, may have cost too much.

Attorney General Eric Holder said executives at the highest levels of the companies conspired to eliminate competition among e-book sellers. Justice’s antitrust chief, Sharis Pozen, said the executives were desperate to get Amazon.com — the marketer of Kindle e-book readers — to raise the $ 9.99 price point it had set for the most popular e-book titles, because that was substantially below their hardcover prices.

The federal govern…………………continues on Monroe News Star
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E-Book Borrowing, Preceded by E-Book Waiting
As a technical matter, it's remarkably easy to borrow an e-book from your local library. But not if you want to take out the best-selling biography of Steven P. Jobs, the hero of the Internet age who helped lure tens of millions of people to personal …
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US sues to lower prices of e-book best-sellers
Article from BusinessWeek:

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